dreaminginsapphire:

Day 1-Thief


morning reblub

dreaminginsapphire:

Day 1-Thief

morning reblub

dreaminginsapphire:

Day 1-Thief

dreaminginsapphire:

Day 1-Thief

→ Watercolour Skin Tones


cliobablio:

image

Hi there! Thanks for your question. I don’t have these down to an exact science, but there are just a few colours I tend to use for skin tones with different ratios for each. I’ve tried to break it down according to how I think about them - I’ll first figure out whether the person is cool or…

Draw All The Things!

Ok so I think I am going to try to give this challenge a shot for the next 30 days. I’m just really tired of feeling uninspired and artblocked :C I’m hoping if I can get at least a sketch out a day I can maybe click back into the drawing groove. Because this is no fun. Might try to use the prompt to draw fandom related things also. 

if you’d like to follow along the tags are #potoodraws and #draw all the things

Animated gifs by artist Kevin Weir

coelasquid:

(Full size image here)
Little piece of digital inking advice I’ve learned from years of doing this sort of thing for projects with strict style guides;
Okay, so, anyone who has experience with digital inking knows the temptation to zoom in and out constantly to tinker with all of your details at different levels. The problem is, this freedom to enhance all you like can get you lost in the rabbit hole of tweaking details at 300% that look aesthetically awful at regular web viewing and print size. It’s an easy way to lose track of the big picture.
When I was on Ugly Americans, one of our most tightly enforced rules on the show was a set zoom level. You had one brush size and one zoom level, and everything on screen had to have the same lineweight. As Aaron Augenblick told us “you can’t zoom in on paper.” This is a piece of advice I’ve carried with me to this day, because I realized even if you aren’t going for a stylistically intentional uniform lineweight, it really helps keep your art decluttered and create easy atmospheric perspective in your line work.
When I was doing the short Nicky Two-vests pitch comic it was really my first time working on a big, print-size 11x17 comic page. The first couple pages I did I couldn’t resist the temptation to go in and utilize the ridiculous resolution to add little finnicky details all over the place. The result was awful and basically had to be redone. That was when I decided to try out this technique, choosing a fixed brush size and fixed zoom level for different depth of field and sticking to that. It helps keep the important focus of the image big and bold, the background subdued
For my personal use, I ink with the Frenden Hairpin Sable in Manga Studio 5EX which readjusts to be the same size on screen as you zoom, but the same technique works in photoshop if you adjust the brush to approximately the same size on screen as you go.

coelasquid:

(Full size image here)

Little piece of digital inking advice I’ve learned from years of doing this sort of thing for projects with strict style guides;

Okay, so, anyone who has experience with digital inking knows the temptation to zoom in and out constantly to tinker with all of your details at different levels. The problem is, this freedom to enhance all you like can get you lost in the rabbit hole of tweaking details at 300% that look aesthetically awful at regular web viewing and print size. It’s an easy way to lose track of the big picture.

When I was on Ugly Americans, one of our most tightly enforced rules on the show was a set zoom level. You had one brush size and one zoom level, and everything on screen had to have the same lineweight. As Aaron Augenblick told us “you can’t zoom in on paper.” This is a piece of advice I’ve carried with me to this day, because I realized even if you aren’t going for a stylistically intentional uniform lineweight, it really helps keep your art decluttered and create easy atmospheric perspective in your line work.

When I was doing the short Nicky Two-vests pitch comic it was really my first time working on a big, print-size 11x17 comic page. The first couple pages I did I couldn’t resist the temptation to go in and utilize the ridiculous resolution to add little finnicky details all over the place. The result was awful and basically had to be redone. That was when I decided to try out this technique, choosing a fixed brush size and fixed zoom level for different depth of field and sticking to that. It helps keep the important focus of the image big and bold, the background subdued

For my personal use, I ink with the Frenden Hairpin Sable in Manga Studio 5EX which readjusts to be the same size on screen as you zoom, but the same technique works in photoshop if you adjust the brush to approximately the same size on screen as you go.

Cute frames ; cute cut!

Thank you!!! ^^

Selfies with hair-do and glasses! Man I like these glasses they are so pretty <3

Also bonus duck face

so fab

thank you!!!

The event that I was super nervous about yesterday went very well. thank you so much my dear friends and followers for your support <3 <3

And while last night was not so hot (and that may have been due to stress or something) today is a good day! I have gotten my new glasses, my shipment of books from amazon came in and I am just feeling pretty happy right now. will try to post some selfies maybe later tonight or tomorrow <3

peashooter85:

What fighting like a girl was all about in Georgian Era Britain —- Elizabeth “Lady Bare Knuckles” Stokes
Think that women’s boxing or MMA fighting is a recent development in fighting sports?  Think again.  From the 18th to early 19th century it was not uncommon for women to fight in the ring as well as men.  Back then boxing was not the boxing of today, not by a long shot.  Venues tended to be saloons, pubs, small arenas, or even open streets and back-alleys.  Rules differed from venue to venue, but for the most part fights were done bare knuckled, and many fights were a no holds barred type setup.  Some fights even included deadly weapons such as clubs, swords, and staves.  Needless to say, injury and death was common.
One of the most famous female fighters in early 18th century Britain was Elizabeth Stokes (born Elizabeth Wilkinson), a mother and fighter whose career lasted mostly throughout the 1720’s.  In 1722 she was challenged by Hannah Highfield for a prize of three guineas.  Stokes accepted the challenge but offered a counter challenge,
 “I, Elizabeth Wilkinson of Clerkenwell, who had earlier had some words with Hannah Hyfield, ‘challenged and invited’ her to meet me on the stage for three guineas. Each fighter will hold half-a-crown in each hand and the first to drop the money would lose the battle”
Elizabeth won after a 22 minute fight, giving Hannah Hyfield a savage thumping that caused her to drop her coin.  Later in the evening she won another fight against a woman named Martha Jones.
After the fight with Hannah Hyfield Stoke’s career took off, making her the most popular female fighter in Britain and earning her the name “Lady Bareknuckles”.  After marrying her husand James Stokes, the couple often fought in paired and tag-team matches.  Incredibly Stoke’s even fought men on a number of occasions, something that was rare in bareknuckle boxing.  Even more incredibly, she trounced them every time, beating the crap out of them with her swift and powerful fists.  Not only was she a master pugilist, Stokes was also skilled with weapons as well.  She was known to be particularly skilled with the cudgel and short sword.
By the mid 19th century women’s fighting had come to a close as professional organizations, rules, and Victorian Era prejudices against women drove the sport underground and turned fighting into a gentlemen’s sport.

peashooter85:

What fighting like a girl was all about in Georgian Era Britain —- Elizabeth “Lady Bare Knuckles” Stokes

Think that women’s boxing or MMA fighting is a recent development in fighting sports?  Think again.  From the 18th to early 19th century it was not uncommon for women to fight in the ring as well as men.  Back then boxing was not the boxing of today, not by a long shot.  Venues tended to be saloons, pubs, small arenas, or even open streets and back-alleys.  Rules differed from venue to venue, but for the most part fights were done bare knuckled, and many fights were a no holds barred type setup.  Some fights even included deadly weapons such as clubs, swords, and staves.  Needless to say, injury and death was common.

One of the most famous female fighters in early 18th century Britain was Elizabeth Stokes (born Elizabeth Wilkinson), a mother and fighter whose career lasted mostly throughout the 1720’s.  In 1722 she was challenged by Hannah Highfield for a prize of three guineas.  Stokes accepted the challenge but offered a counter challenge,

 “I, Elizabeth Wilkinson of Clerkenwell, who had earlier had some words with Hannah Hyfield, ‘challenged and invited’ her to meet me on the stage for three guineas. Each fighter will hold half-a-crown in each hand and the first to drop the money would lose the battle”

Elizabeth won after a 22 minute fight, giving Hannah Hyfield a savage thumping that caused her to drop her coin.  Later in the evening she won another fight against a woman named Martha Jones.

After the fight with Hannah Hyfield Stoke’s career took off, making her the most popular female fighter in Britain and earning her the name “Lady Bareknuckles”.  After marrying her husand James Stokes, the couple often fought in paired and tag-team matches.  Incredibly Stoke’s even fought men on a number of occasions, something that was rare in bareknuckle boxing.  Even more incredibly, she trounced them every time, beating the crap out of them with her swift and powerful fists.  Not only was she a master pugilist, Stokes was also skilled with weapons as well.  She was known to be particularly skilled with the cudgel and short sword.

By the mid 19th century women’s fighting had come to a close as professional organizations, rules, and Victorian Era prejudices against women drove the sport underground and turned fighting into a gentlemen’s sport.

theghostoflove
CREDIT